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Less than perfect eyesight won't just make your world look a little blurred. Left uncorrected, poor eyesight can lead to frequent headaches and eyestrain, and may even make driving and other activities more dangerous. It is important to remind your patients to get an eye exam every year to maintain ocular health and to have sharp, clear vision. Always offering your patients ZEISS lenses with premium coating means you are offering your patients the quality solutions, at the best value for common vision problems. Understanding the common vision problems helps you understand your patients, so you can help put their world back into focus.

 

As you get older, the lenses of your eyes thicken and lose flexibility, making it harder for them to adjust and focus on nearby objects. This is a natural part of the eye’s aging process. It often becomes a problem after turning 40, and you may start holding menus or newspapers at arm’s length to read them and experience eye fatigue along with headaches when doing close-up work. Even if you’ve never used glasses, you may need them now. Modern progressive lenses offer key advantages over bifocal and trifocal lenses. These lenses provide the most natural viewing experience. Progressive lenses have a subtle shift between the power in the upper part (for distant objects) and the lower part of the lens (for reading and other close work). And unlike bifocals, there’s no visible, distinct line between the distance and reading parts of the lens. Instead, they are linked by an area of gradually changing power, which also provides vision for intermediate distances at arm’s length. And they’re designed to be worn all day — so your entire world stays in focus.

 
  • Take off glasses
  • Put on glasses
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Presbyopia is a condition of the eye where the crystalline lens loses its ability to adapt to near objects with age resulting in blurred images of near objects.

 
 

 

If you have myopia, you can see close objects clearly, but distant objects are blurry, because your eyes focus images at a point in front of your retina instead of on it. This is often referred to as short or near-sighted.

To bring those distant objects back into focus, you’ll be prescribed a concave, minus, eyeglass lens that will move the focal point back to the correct spot on your retina.

 
  • Take off glasses
  • Put on glasses
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A short-sighted eye forms an image of a distant object in front of the retina. The image seen is blurred.

 
 

 

If you’re farsighted, your eyes focus images at a point behind the retina, which can make objects that are close seem blurry. This is often referred to as long or far-sighted.

To improve your sight, you’ll need a convex, plus, eyeglass lens to move your eyes’ focal points onto the retina.

 
  • Take off glasses
  • Put on glasses
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A long-sighted eye forms an image of a distant object behind the retina. The image seen is blurred.

 
 

 

 
  • Astigmatism
  • Astigmatic vision
  • Put on glasses
  • Take off glasses
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The meridians of an astigmatic eye display different curvatures.

 

Understanding Prism in Lenses

By Darryl Meister

A guide on prism and what it means to your patients. Includes information on the definition of prism, the purpose of prescribing prism, prismatic effects, identifying prism in lenses, and ANSI tolerances.

Understanding Prism in Lenses


Fine Tuning Vision

 
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